Rare dental disease may leave boy toothless

By JP du Plessis
GAUTENG – A rare case of Anodontia, a genetically inherited dental disease, has left a seven-year-old Boksburg resident with little to smile about.
Bennie Marais was diagnosed with the disease two weeks ago, while he was having a check-up at the Boksburg Medicross, leaving dentist Dr Peet Badenhorst with no option but to pull out all his permanent teeth.
“This is a very rare disease which stops the teeth from forming enamel,” said Dr Badenhorst.
“Bennie is left with two options: he can get dentures, which can be fitted only when he is 10 years old, or have implants, at an estimated initial cost of R50 000.”
Dr Badenhorst came across Bennie after offering to assist the Lona Kruger Feeding Scheme, which provides food for underprivileged children and their families in the Boksburg area.

Kids & Brushing

In my younger ages, I don't think I liked to brush, it was a hassle, I would rather play a few minutes more than brush and go to bed.  Just like everything else that kids like to get away from, brushing, sleeping, showering, doing home work, doing the house chores, etc. etc...

Now I know I wasn't the only one Smile Eighty-one percent of U.S. parents report that there is some problem with the way their children brush their teeth, a survey found.

Discount dental plans VS Dental Insurance

According to the U.S. department of health and human services more than 108 million Americans do not have dental Insurance.

And I don't blame them, Dental Insurance could be pretty expensive, I think I pay about $60/month and I don't really use it (which is a good thing, not needing to use it) but then you have it just in case like everything else, from cell phone insurance to fire insurance, and hit & run insurance, etc. etc...all those just in case things that add up to your bills every month.

However Dental care is very important, you got to take care of those little rocks in your mouth, either it's to have a beatifull smile, preventing cavity pain, or just having healthy teeth so they don't fall off.

66 percent of Chinese five-year-olds suffer tooth decay

The People's Daily Reports

 

Nearly 66 percent of China's five-year olds have decayed teeth, although the figure is down 11 percent from a decade ago, according to the Ministry of Health.

China's third national survey on oral health showed each five-year-old child with dental disease had 3.5 decayed teeth on average last year, one tooth less than the previous decade.

"Although China has witnessed an obvious drop in dental diseases, it still lags behind the World Health Organisation (WHO) standard," said Zhang Boxue, a professor with the National Committee of Oral Health.

Pages